About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
that the government reduce its deficit as a condition for raising the debt ceiling. both democrats and republicans earth tactics that shut down the government and ultimately cost america its aaa credit rating for the first time in history. but in a last-minute compromise, both sides agree to a trillion dollars in spending cuts up front and another $1.2 trillion in cuts to be decided by a special congressional supercommittee. but a poison pill was attached. if the supercommittee can't reach a deal, automatic across the board cuts known as a sequester would go into effect be at the exact moment when those bush tax cuts extended for two years would expire. so the point is we could have all seen this coming and some of us did. we yelled at the top of our lungs about it but were drowned out by the election. it seems that good governance gets drowned out by continuous elections in america. this time there may be a serious price to pay for it. >> if we go off the fiscal cliff, be will you notice an immediate change to your wallet? we want to get a reality check from stephen moore, a member of the wall st
it was established. but $90 million is not that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since 1992, when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the debt. the depression-era kid and army vet says he wants to give back to a country that has given him so much, a feeling that is infectious. he knows his money wouldn't avert the fiscal cliff. but that is not the message garcia is sending to congress. >> in order to really solve the $16 trillion national debt, you have to sacrifice. >> reporter: politicians talk about kicking the can down the road. one american that is decided that road has to end. and it might as well be here. kyung lah, cnn, san antonio, texas. >>> you have to love that story. and a lot of us lived this one, the wild ride to election day, 2012. cnn national political correspondent jim acosta has more on the story. >> repo
't that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says, you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since -- >> 1992. >> reporter: that's when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the death. the depression era kid and army veteran says he's giving back to a country that's given him so much. a sense that's infectious. his daughter is now collecting cabs at work. his grandson drives garcia to friends' houses, just to collect more cans. garcia knows that his monthly money orders won't avert the fiscal cliff, but his priest says that's not the message garcia's sending to congress. >> in order to really solve the $16 trillion national debt, you have to sacrifice. >> reporter: politicians talk about kicking the can down the road. one american has decided that road has to end, and it might as well be here. so if you want to be, like his granddaughter says, be like grandpa, you can google the
that getting the debt and deficit under control is in the interests of younger generations so they are not saddled with debt solely for our current consumption. but how we get there matters an awful lot. if you raise taxes on people at the top, that affects people mostly in their peak earning year, late 40s to their late 50s. if you focus the spending cuts on discretionary spending which is what we've done so far, you squeeze investment thes in the next generation. education, infrastructure, research. there really needs to be a balance both between taxes and spending and then on the spending side between restraining discretionary spending and restraining entitlements which are aimed at today's seniors. >> so many times we've heard talk about generational warfare between old and young. but this is a little bit different. >> right. first of all, there is no -- today there is generational warfare more in the opposite direction. the polls show that young people by and large are willing to pay for entitlements for today's seniors. what's eroded is the willingness of today's senior
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4